PRAISE

 

At one of the memorial services for Dallas Willard a USC colleague offered a wonderful eulogy: Dallas was a man whose hearing didn’t get better when praise was thrown his way.

 

 

WHY KINDLE CAN’T REPLACE BOOKS

photo 2

Above is a picture out of my copy of Augustine’s Confessions.

I am listening in parts to a long interview with Maria Popova, curator of Brain Pickings (recommended yesterday).  During the interview, Popova and Tim Ferris, the interviewer, bemoan the fact that publishers limit how many quotes you can easily access on Kindle.  The number is high, but there is a limit and the only way around it is time-consuming.  

So I will continue to read books the old fashioned way!

 

HOW CHANGE SHOULD OCCUR…ONE OPINION

Edmund Burke

David Brooks: Burke is famous for his belief in gradual change. He didn’t believe in revolutionary change because he thought that society was too complicated to be planned through reason and remade according to that plan. My students [at Yale] were divided on this. Some saw wisdom in this modesty, pointing to failed efforts to remake societies, ranging from the war in Iraq to the Russian revolution. Others pointed out that most systems are constructed by those in power for those in power. If you don’t have radical change, you just allow entrenched privilege to stay in power forever.

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/21/what-would-edmund-burke-say/?_php=true&_type=blogs&smid=tw-nytdavidbrooks&seid=auto&_r=0

EMOTIONS, RATIONALITY, AND GENDER

Tim Savage is the pastor of a church back in my hometown of Phoenix. I vividly recall Tim telling me that Morna Hooker, his doctoral supervisor at Cambridge, seemed to understand the pathos of Paul better than many male, Pauline scholars.

Hooker can hold her own intellectually against any male New Testament scholar, but it does seem many (not all) women may have a bit of an edge in picking up the less than rational components.

Allow me to clarify a few things, but please know my thinking in this area is provisional and partial. Not much is set in stone.

“Less than rational components” does not equal anti-rational. Like Pascal, I think “the heart has its reasons that reason knows not of.” This certainly does not make these “less than rational” things irrational.

As to an example, perhaps we could look at Paul’s affliction which resulted in despair (II Cor. 1:8,9). We don’t know for sure, but perhaps some of that affliction was not physical in nature. And maybe a female scholar might be more sensitive that the non physical affliction of the “concern for all the churches” could’ve contributed to Paul’s despair.

As a male who has a strong gift of discernment, I still find my wife (a summa cum laude graduate of seminary, so plenty capable on the “rational” stuff) picking up clues, especially with our sons, that I miss at times. I must add though that I also pick up clues that she sometimes misses, which is why I said my observations are “provisional and partial.”