Pooping Elephants

WAITING FOR THE WEEKEND

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0140126635/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i15

There is elegant writing and wonderful insights throughout this terrific book.

I took this book with me on a recent trip to Mexico. It was a terrific companion.

There is much about leisure that most of us do not appreciate. Rybczynski clears the confusion and offers a feast for further reflection.

The author includes many insights from history and different cultures. It is a rewarding read!

REALLY, NOT JUST FOR PREACHERS!

I have read several books on preaching. None have been duds, but this one may now be my favorite. I don’t know of any other book on preaching that accomplishes so much in so little space (under 150 pages).

Bruce Waltke and others are gushing about it and I add my name to the gushers.  Short, but full of powerful and wonderful insights.  Beautifully written. Integrative approach.  Careful biblical studies of memory along with things from neuroscience, psychology, etc.

And of course, you will learn how remembering is very different than recall.

Highly recommended!

DELIGHT IN LEARNING

From my forthcoming book on history, Making Connections: Discovering the Riches of the Past:

According to neuroscientist, Daniel Levitin, we are hardwired (he thinks due to evolution, I think due to God) to name our world. Not only are we hardwired to do so, but we delight in doing so:

This innate passion for naming and categorizing can be brought into stark relief by the fact that most of the naming we do in the plant world might be considered strictly unnecessary. Out of the 30,000 edible plants thought to exist on earth, just eleven account for 93% of all that humans eat: oats, corn, rice, wheat, potatoes, yucca (also called tapioca or cassava), sorghum, millet, beans, barley, and rye. Yet our brains evolved to receive a pleasant shot of dopamine when we learn something new and again when we classify it systematically into an ordered structure.[1]

With respect to history, it is easy to see that classification (knowing some of the differences between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment) provides a necessary scaffolding to keep learning and delighting in one’s understanding of the world.

[1] Daniel J. Levitin, The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in an Age of Information Overload (New York, NY: Dutton, 2014), 32.