Pooping Elephants

CARING FOR WORDS IN A CULTURE OF LIES

I recently read McEntyre’s Make a List which was terrific.  I have been wanting to read Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies for some time and finally got around to it.  It did not disappoint.

This book will inspire you to see the beauty and power of well-crafted words.

Not that this was the author’s explicit purpose, but it helps us read Scripture more carefully.

THE BED OF PROCRUSTES

From Amazon:
The Bed of Procrustes takes its title from Greek mythology: the story of a man who made his visitors fit his bed to perfection by either stretching them or cutting their limbs. It represents Taleb’s view of modern civilization’s hubristic side effects—modifying humans to satisfy technology, blaming reality for not fitting economic models, inventing diseases to sell drugs, defining intelligence as what can be tested in a classroom, and convincing people that employment is not slavery.
From Me:
Insightful
Entertaining
Overstated
Lots to ponder
Some to dismiss
Glad I read

I’M DESPERATE!

When people ask Pastor Tim Keller why he reads so much, he simply says, “I’m desperate.”  Keller is desperate for insight to help himself and others.  I resonate deeply with this sentiment.  In fact, it seems very odd to me that any Christian, especially pastors and those in full-time vocational ministry, would be needing to explain/justify the need to read.  I should also say that I am constantly stunned by how many pastors and those in full-time vocational, Christian ministry do not read or read books not worthy of their time.

I was recently asked by a friend about my own reading habits.  Here is what I told him:

I usually have a book with me wherever I go. I have them for appointments so don’t mind at all when someone is late! If I have a package to take to the post office, a book will be with me. And the DMV or waiting for a haircut are great times to read. You get the picture. There are lots of places/times to redeem the time.

On top of these haphazard things, I read intentionally 50-60 important books per year and peruse hundreds. The 50-60 include lots of highlighting, marginalia, and then sifting out what is most beneficial for teaching, discipleship, and writing projects. I also read several dozen journal or magazine articles.

As I get older, I am rereading the most formative books in my own personal canon. So The Great Divorce was recently reread. Interestingly, C.S. Lewis famously said legitimate readers are re-readers of important books. I think that is true.

Of course, I am always reading Scripture which this year means 2-4 chapters of meditative reads with note taking and highlighting. Scripture memory and review are daily disciplines which go back over forty years ago to my early college days. Then ten verses of my Greek NT along with some vocabulary review and basic grammar.

People regularly mention that I have a good memory.  I think that is true to some extent.  However, let it be known that review, review, review is a major staple of my life.

HOW TO TALK TO ONE ANOTHER

Theologians are generally leery, even disdainful (usually in quiet, socially accepted ways!) of “lay” people. And so-called “lay” people tend to return the favor. There are many reasons for this, and Keith Johnson helps unpack them for us.

Johnson’s book is desperately needed since the animus between professional theologians and the church is acute and does not seem to be getting any better.

The author provides a good historical sketch of how theology moved away from the church and found itself in the academy. This offers perspective for how we ought to proceed in understanding the challenge of wedding theology to the church.

Johnson writes with a gracious touch but makes clear how we all need to make amends for our less than Christlike behavior.

FOUR TYPES OF PEOPLE

My wife and I were talking about a piece she read by Tim Keller in which he describes two types of people:

    Those who get what they want and are not happy

    Those who do not get what they want and are not happy

My wife took the second group of people and made two groups:

    Those who have given up believing they will ever get what they want to be happy

    Those who have not given up believing they will ever get what they want to be happy

As we were talking about all this, Doreen asked me if I thought there were non-Christians who truly were happy with their lives.  I do. In fact, I know some. They have not yet gotten to Ecc. 2:11. (Take a gander to see what I mean if you are not familiar with this terrific section of Scripture.)  Their hearts are still satisfied with their lives apart from God.

My question to you: Why are so many Christians such unhappy folk?