Category Archives: Book Review

TELLING A BETTER STORY

The best compliment I can pay this book is that it joins my list of favorite dead and living authors for better engagement with our culture.

For the former, there are Augustine, Pascal, Chesterton, Lewis and Newbigin. For the later there are Dan Taylor, James K.A. Smith, Tim Keller, Charles Taylor, and James Davison Hunter.

THE TEMPLE AND THE TABERNACLE

The Temple and the Tabernacle is one of those books I can recommend with gusto.

The text of the book is gorgeously accented with loads of pictures. Baker has done a truly stellar job with the production of this book.

Hays is a careful reader of Scripture. He does not make wild claims, yet there are many wonderful insights throughout his book.

I learned much from this book. It is accessible, but loaded with insight.

My safe guess is that it will help you make better sense of the tabernacle and the temple.

THE RISE AND TRIUMPH OF THE MODERN SELF

Carl Trueman’s writings always deliver. In the fall, I will be interviewing him on The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self. I get loads of books from various publishers, but there is no book I have more looked forward to reading.

For a taste of Carl’s writing, check out this recent essay in First Things:

https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2020/06/a-dark-cloud-for-democracy

PAUL AND THE GIANTS OF PHILOSOPHY

A terrific introduction to the similarities and differences between Paul and other philosophers.

I have been interested especially in how Christianity interacted with Stoicism. This book has much to offer in that regard. The various contributions are balanced and wise.

Recently, I interviewed C. Kavin Rowe on his influential book, One True Life. There is an entire chapter in Paul and the Giants of Philosophy dedicated to looking at the strengths and potential weaknesses of Rowe’s book. That chapter alone made this book a worthwhile read.

THE J CURVE

For the first half of this book, I felt the author was a bit redundant. That criticism probably still stands, but I found the second half of the book terrific. It’s not that the first half is worth skipping over. It still offers much, but I think the examples of dying and rising with Christ could have been reduced.

I greatly appreciated the illumination Miller brought to bear from ancient history. His exegesis of some key passages is also well done.

HOW ADAM SMITH CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE

How Adam Smith can Change Your Life is wise, insightful, entertaining, and well-written. How much more can you ask of a book?

I learned much about Adam Smith. If you think of Adam Smith as the fountainhead of capitalist greed, you will be surprised by his clarion call to virtue.

As a Christian, I believe Smith’s Deism and glad embrace of the Enlightenment made him too optimistic about the potential of humans to do good. I certainly believe all humans, irrespective of religion, can do good because all people are created in the image of God. And Smith believed that humans do very bad things, but I think he was a bit naïve about the penchant of all us to do things that are destructive and yes, irrational.

How Adam Smith can Change Your Life is a great read and one that I highly recommend!

WHAT A BOOK!

I read a lot of history.  Usually, I have to read long books (400 pages plus) to get as much insight as this much shorter one by Gregg.  In only 166 pages the author gives intellectual insights on every page.  It is a feast for both heart and mind.

The writing is clear and compelling.  Gregg knows the flow of Western ideas very well.  He communicates with ease some of the main currents of thought.

It is rare that the number of my markings (or marginalia) exceeds the number of the pages of a book I have read, but this is one of those rare times.

I highly recommend this balanced and beautifully conceived book!

RUN TO YOUR BOOKSTORE!

Even easier you can order this magnificent work online!

I have read and reread Rutledge’s big book on the crucifixion. I made nearly 600 notes in the margin during the first read and another 300 plus during the second read. I interviewed Fleming Rutledge in 2018. It is a brilliant and beautiful book, but Advent is now my favorite.

Advent is more accessible than The Crucifixion of Jesus because it is a collection of sermons. Don’t let that fool you. These are meaty sermons with Rutledge’s trademark goodies in the footnotes.

There are some places I may disagree with the author, but I enthusiastically recommend Advent!