Category Archives: Book Review

WHAT A BOOK!

I read a lot of history.  Usually, I have to read long books (400 pages plus) to get as much insight as this much shorter one by Gregg.  In only 166 pages the author gives intellectual insights on every page.  It is a feast for both heart and mind.

The writing is clear and compelling.  Gregg knows the flow of Western ideas very well.  He communicates with ease some of the main currents of thought.

It is rare that the number of my markings (or marginalia) exceeds the number of the pages of a book I have read, but this is one of those rare times.

I highly recommend this balanced and beautifully conceived book!

RUN TO YOUR BOOKSTORE!

Even easier you can order this magnificent work online!

I have read and reread Rutledge’s big book on the crucifixion. I made nearly 600 notes in the margin during the first read and another 300 plus during the second read. I interviewed Fleming Rutledge in 2018. It is a brilliant and beautiful book, but Advent is now my favorite.

Advent is more accessible than The Crucifixion of Jesus because it is a collection of sermons. Don’t let that fool you. These are meaty sermons with Rutledge’s trademark goodies in the footnotes.

There are some places I may disagree with the author, but I enthusiastically recommend Advent!

EMERSON’S PROTEGES

I am writing my own book that will feature Emerson and another well-known American thinker, so I am in the midst of much research.

This book crossed my radar and I am glad it did.

There are brilliant insights throughout as attested by my marginalia.

If you are interested in Emerson, and especially how he interacted with his “disciples,” this is a great read.

ON THE ROAD WITH SAINT AUGUSTINE

In lieu of a typical book review, as is my habit from time to time, allow me to mention half a dozen things I greatly appreciated about this book.  It will definitely make the list for my “Favorite Books of the Year.”

This is the seventh book I’ve read by Smith.  All of them made me think in fresh and provocative ways.  How (Not) to be Secular was my favorite. It now comes in a close second to Smith’s latest.  On the Road with Saint Augustine is now my favorite.  

So here are a half dozen things I appreciated about this book:

*There is elegant writing combined with keen insights.  It is no surprise that On the Road with Saint Augustine received a coveted starred review by Publishers Weekly.

*It makes a compelling case for why Augustine is the ideal travel partner as we make our way through life.  For me, both Augustine and Bunyan (there are others) have been indispenable to have as my vagabond friends.

*There is a thick realism in this book (take note Joel Osteen), but Smith always keeps this tethered to a compelling hope.

*Smith has a good nose for the telling quote or captivating illustration.  HIs wide-reading across various disciplines showcases the brilliance of Augustine.

*In my own teaching, and especially in my ministry of discipleship with men, this is the kind of book that I can use as a gateway of sorts to the riches of Christian history.

*I’ve always found that great books help me clarify important issues.  My marginalia reflects this reality in On the Road with Saint Augustine.  For example, in the chapter on friendship, Smith’s interaction with Heidegger resulted in my marginal comment of “Molds are everywhere, so it is impossible to break out of every single mold.”  In other words, autonomous individuals don’t exist because they can’t exist.

Whenever the time comes that sales begin to dwindle for this book, I would recommend Brazos making booklets out of some chapters.  For example, the chapter on freedom is one I would love to give to any thoughtful person, irrespective of whether they are a Christian. 

 

PASTOR PAUL

This is the fourth book of Scot’s I’ve read.  In particular, his Kingdom Conspiracy, made a big impact on me.  Pastor Paul was just as impactful.

From time to time instead of a regular review, I like to list a half dozen things I appreciated about a book.  Here they are for Pastor Paul:

*Scot’s expertise in handling both the biblical material and ancient history is on wonderful display.  The historical material illumines the biblical points in ways that give more color and texture to Paul’s ministry.

*The writing is elegant and accessible.

*Pastor Paul is written in what I would call a “gentle prophetic” spirit.  Scot does not pull his punches in telling us the truth about touchy subjects like money and friendship, but one does not feel “beat up” over his candor.  

*There are many good expositions on a whole range of subjects.  My favorites are probably the ones on friendship and the honor culture of Paul’s time.

*The title is apt, but don’t be mistaken.  Pastor Paul is a book that all Christians, even non pastors, can benefit greatly from.

*I greatly enjoy books that show the incredible relevance of knowing the past.  Pastor Paul showcases how a growing historical sense gives wisdom for how we live today.

Since this “review” is also on my Amazon account, let me mention that it was easy to give five stars.

 

WAITING FOR THE WEEKEND

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0140126635/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i15

There is elegant writing and wonderful insights throughout this terrific book.

I took this book with me on a recent trip to Mexico. It was a terrific companion.

There is much about leisure that most of us do not appreciate. Rybczynski clears the confusion and offers a feast for further reflection.

The author includes many insights from history and different cultures. It is a rewarding read!