Category Archives: Character

I AM A MYSTERY TO MYSELF! HOW ABOUT YOU?

I resonate with these words:

“Whoever meditates on the mystery of his own life will quickly realize why only God, the searcher of the secrets of the heart, can pass final judgment. We cannot judge what we have no access to. The self is a swirling conflict of fears, impulses, sentiments, interests, allergies, and foibles. It is a metaphysical given for which there is no easy rational explanation. Now if we cannot unveil the mystery of our own motives and affections, how much less can we unveil the mystery in others? That is, as we look into ourselves, we encounter the mystery of our own, the depths of our own selfhood. As we sing things like ‘Just as I am, though tossed about with many a conflict, many a doubt, fightings within and fears without, O Lamb of God, I come.’ And having recognized the mysteries that dwell in the very depths of our own being, how can we treat other people as if they were empty or superficial beings, without the same kind of mystery?”

The rest is here:

https://blogs.thegospelcoalition.org/rayortlund/2017/04/25/edward-john-carnell-1919-1967/

OUR SON, COACH DAVID

Our oldest son, David, helps coach at risk boys in Dallas.  Yesterday, Doreen and I very spontaneously drove up to see the championship game.  We lost as you probably can guess by enlarging the photo.

It is wonderful to see David using his gifts for God’s glory and the good of others. 

TWO PEOPLE STAND OUT

There are two men who have taught me the most about the proper ways to integrate theology and literature: Ralph Wood and Roger Lundin.  I have interviewed Ralph before, and Lord willing shall be going back to Baylor for another interview.  I corresponded with Roger.  I was planning on meeting with Roger during my lecture at Wheaton, but Roger unexpectedly died a few days prior to my talk.  Jeremy Begbie of Duke collaborated with Roger.  Here is part of Begbie’s tribute:

He cared about words – or better put, he cared for people through words: his students, colleagues and readers. That was why he labored so hard to find the right ones. That was why – with that memorable sidelong glance – he paused so often in conversation. That is why he spent hours and hours revising and re-editing his essays and books. In all the years I knew Roger I can honestly say I never remember him using words carelessly. He knew that careless words could hurt, maim and wound. In a culture deluged with half-thought out words, sloppy, hollowed-out language, he saw it as his calling to hone words full of care for others, full of the winsome generosity of God. And in the corridors of the academy, few things are needed more today. We academics revel in large words – to impress, to intimidate. He inspired us to use words with largesse. And that is a legacy beyond measure.

The rest is here: http://www.transpositions.co.uk/tribute-to-professor-roger-lundin/

SOULFUL AND SOILFUL SPIRITUALITY

Humble Roots: How Humility Grounds and Nourishes Your Soul

https://www.amazon.com/Humble-Roots-Humility-Grounds-Nourishes/dp/0802414591/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

This is not a “how to” book, which among other things, makes it so good.

Anderson’s uses her wide-ranging experience in gardening to tease out lessons on humility.

The author is vulnerable about her own foibles and failings, but not indulgent. Throughout her beautiful and winsome book, there are many wise reflections on what matters most.

A book to savor, especially for those who are tired of the typical formulaic approach in much of popular, Christian literature.