Category Archives: Character

OUR SON, COACH DAVID

Our oldest son, David, helps coach at risk boys in Dallas.  Yesterday, Doreen and I very spontaneously drove up to see the championship game.  We lost as you probably can guess by enlarging the photo.

It is wonderful to see David using his gifts for God’s glory and the good of others. 

TWO PEOPLE STAND OUT

There are two men who have taught me the most about the proper ways to integrate theology and literature: Ralph Wood and Roger Lundin.  I have interviewed Ralph before, and Lord willing shall be going back to Baylor for another interview.  I corresponded with Roger.  I was planning on meeting with Roger during my lecture at Wheaton, but Roger unexpectedly died a few days prior to my talk.  Jeremy Begbie of Duke collaborated with Roger.  Here is part of Begbie’s tribute:

He cared about words – or better put, he cared for people through words: his students, colleagues and readers. That was why he labored so hard to find the right ones. That was why – with that memorable sidelong glance – he paused so often in conversation. That is why he spent hours and hours revising and re-editing his essays and books. In all the years I knew Roger I can honestly say I never remember him using words carelessly. He knew that careless words could hurt, maim and wound. In a culture deluged with half-thought out words, sloppy, hollowed-out language, he saw it as his calling to hone words full of care for others, full of the winsome generosity of God. And in the corridors of the academy, few things are needed more today. We academics revel in large words – to impress, to intimidate. He inspired us to use words with largesse. And that is a legacy beyond measure.

The rest is here: http://www.transpositions.co.uk/tribute-to-professor-roger-lundin/

SOULFUL AND SOILFUL SPIRITUALITY

Humble Roots: How Humility Grounds and Nourishes Your Soul

https://www.amazon.com/Humble-Roots-Humility-Grounds-Nourishes/dp/0802414591/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

This is not a “how to” book, which among other things, makes it so good.

Anderson’s uses her wide-ranging experience in gardening to tease out lessons on humility.

The author is vulnerable about her own foibles and failings, but not indulgent. Throughout her beautiful and winsome book, there are many wise reflections on what matters most.

A book to savor, especially for those who are tired of the typical formulaic approach in much of popular, Christian literature.

OBAMA’S WISE COUNSEL TO HIS DAUGHTERS

What President Obama told his daughters about Trump:

“What I say to them is that people are complicated,” Obama told me. “Societies and cultures are really complicated … This is not mathematics; this is biology and chemistry. These are living organisms, and it’s messy. And your job as a citizen and as a decent human being is to constantly affirm and lift up and fight for treating people with kindness and respect and understanding. And you should anticipate that at any given moment there’s going to be flare-ups of bigotry that you may have to confront, or may be inside you and you have to vanquish. And it doesn’t stop … You don’t get into a fetal position about it. You don’t start worrying about apocalypse. You say, O.K., where are the places where I can push to keep it moving forward.”

HT: Karen Swallow Prior Twitter Account

The rest is here:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/11/28/obama-reckons-with-a-trump-presidency

 

 

THREE QUESTIONS…FOR ALL OF US

The presidential election is now history.  I came up with three questions I would love to have all voters answer:

Our founding fathers believed character was integral to governing well. Do you think this is still relevant?

What personal revelation about your candidate of choice would have caused you to change your mind about voting for him/her?

On a scale of one to ten, with ten being the worst, how intoxicated do you think you are with the corridors of political power?