Category Archives: Philosophy

LEGOS AND PHILOSOPHY

I recently heard an incredible interview with a philosopher on the nature of time. She teaches at Notre Dame but check out how she combines both your loves in her Twitter description. Since our oldest still loves Legos and the younger brother loves philosophy, it was wonderful to see both together!

Meghan Sullivan
@MeghanS69635195
Philosopher, Fellow Traveler, Lego Enthusiast

MICHEL FOUCAULT

This is a terrific introduction to the thought of Michel Foucault. When I say “introduction” that certainly does not mean this is an easy read. Watkin does make his extensive learning more accessible, but Foucault is not the easiest person in the world to comprehend.

I knew a bit about Foucault from other books but had not read him directly. Watkin does a good job of laying out several of the critical ideas to Foucault’s thought.

In the second half of the book the author does a stellar job of showing how the Christian faith best responds to Foucault.

PAUL AND THE GIANTS OF PHILOSOPHY

A terrific introduction to the similarities and differences between Paul and other philosophers.

I have been interested especially in how Christianity interacted with Stoicism. This book has much to offer in that regard. The various contributions are balanced and wise.

Recently, I interviewed C. Kavin Rowe on his influential book, One True Life. There is an entire chapter in Paul and the Giants of Philosophy dedicated to looking at the strengths and potential weaknesses of Rowe’s book. That chapter alone made this book a worthwhile read.

WHAT A BOOK!

I read a lot of history.  Usually, I have to read long books (400 pages plus) to get as much insight as this much shorter one by Gregg.  In only 166 pages the author gives intellectual insights on every page.  It is a feast for both heart and mind.

The writing is clear and compelling.  Gregg knows the flow of Western ideas very well.  He communicates with ease some of the main currents of thought.

It is rare that the number of my markings (or marginalia) exceeds the number of the pages of a book I have read, but this is one of those rare times.

I highly recommend this balanced and beautifully conceived book!

SOURCES OF THE SELF

Among other “lighter” reading, I am tacking two important, but formidable books: After Virtue: a Study in Moral Theory by Alasdair MacIntyre and Sources of the Self: the Making of Modern Identity by Charles Taylor.  It is good to have friends like Bill and Tim accompany me for both of these adventures.

Here’s a page from a recent read, though many times I am reading sections more than once (!) from Sources of the Self: