Category Archives: Creativity

PHIL’S CRAZY COFFEE CONCOCTION

https://www.barstoolsports.com/blog/2739641/phil-mickelsons-morning-coffee-routine-is-a-goddamn-science-experiment?utm_content=buffer42171&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=t.co&utm_campaign=organic_social_twitter_BarstoolTweetss

After watching this, my friend, Scott Shadrach, said:

I’m playing Monday with my son,  Peter. I wonder if Phil’s coffee concoction will keep me from shanking, slicing, chunking, blading, and/or whiffing?  Oops, I forgot about topping, hooking, casting, swaying, or reverse pivoting. 

EXCELLENCE!

I have wanted to see this for many years, and finally did.  Absolutely great!  I love seeing excellence.  And to think that so many are consumed with excellence when it is only for a perishable wreath?  How much more ought I as a Christian shoot for excellence!  (I Cor. 9:24-27) It also makes me long for churches to be more like a great restaurant.

ANTHONY BOURDAIN

I like food and I like folks who can carry a good conversation, so I liked watching Bourdain’s shows.  Our older son and I got to meet him years ago at Book People.  We had to wait for a few hours as we were at the back of the line.  We got to him after he signed autographs for hundreds.  He was present with our son, affable, and very kind.

A good interview with Bourdain.  HT: James K.A. Smith

https://www.newyorker.com/podcast/the-new-yorker-radio-hour/anthony-bourdains-interview-with-david-remnick

 

TWO PEOPLE STAND OUT

There are two men who have taught me the most about the proper ways to integrate theology and literature: Ralph Wood and Roger Lundin.  I have interviewed Ralph before, and Lord willing shall be going back to Baylor for another interview.  I corresponded with Roger.  I was planning on meeting with Roger during my lecture at Wheaton, but Roger unexpectedly died a few days prior to my talk.  Jeremy Begbie of Duke collaborated with Roger.  Here is part of Begbie’s tribute:

He cared about words – or better put, he cared for people through words: his students, colleagues and readers. That was why he labored so hard to find the right ones. That was why – with that memorable sidelong glance – he paused so often in conversation. That is why he spent hours and hours revising and re-editing his essays and books. In all the years I knew Roger I can honestly say I never remember him using words carelessly. He knew that careless words could hurt, maim and wound. In a culture deluged with half-thought out words, sloppy, hollowed-out language, he saw it as his calling to hone words full of care for others, full of the winsome generosity of God. And in the corridors of the academy, few things are needed more today. We academics revel in large words – to impress, to intimidate. He inspired us to use words with largesse. And that is a legacy beyond measure.

The rest is here: http://www.transpositions.co.uk/tribute-to-professor-roger-lundin/

HOW TO SIGN A BOOK

I’ve done some book signings for my own books.  Several writer friends have put nice notes to me in copies of their books.  But none have done what Edith Schaeffer did when I asked (in the summer of 1986) her to sign a book for my then girlfriend, Doreen!  By the way, it was perhaps the most idyllic place I’ve been: out in the Swiss country surrounded by the Alps.

photo(2) cop