Category Archives: Quotable

Quotable and Wise

From Pastor Derwin Gray:

“The church should be a tutor to the world of what racial reconciliation looks like.”

“Teamwork makes the dream work.”

“God loves big buts.”
“The scene of the crime is your mind.”

DON’T FORGET!

If you are trying to persuade someone, keep in mind this insight from David Hume:

“And as reasoning is not the source, whence either disputant derives his tenets; it is vain to expect, that any logic, which speaks not to the affections, will ever engage him to embrace sounder principles.”

(As quoted in Haidt, The Righteous Mind, p. 57)

 

TOO SARCASTIC?

“No other country houses so many gorgeous frauds and imbeciles as the United States, and in consequence no other country is so amusing. Thus my patriotism is impeccable, though perhaps not orthodox.  I love my country as a small boy loves the circus.”

H.L. Mencken as Quoted in Writers to Read: Nine Names that Belong on Your Shelf by Douglas Wilson

https://www.amazon.com/Writers-Read-Names-Belong-Bookshelf/dp/1433545837

HUMILITY AND LEARNING ARE TWINS

From Ryan Holiday (www.ryanholiday.net):

“The nine­-time Grammy– and Pulitzer Prize–winning jazz musician Wynton Marsalis once advised a promising young musician on the mind­set required in the lifelong study of music: ‘Humility engenders learning because it beats back the arrogance that puts blinders on. It leaves you open for truths to reveal themselves. You don’t stand in your own way. . . . Do you know how you can tell when someone is truly humble? I believe there’s one simple test: because they consistently observe and listen, the humble improve. They don’t assume, ‘I know the way.’ No matter what you’ve done up to this point, you better still be a student. If you’re not still learning, you’re already dying.”

CLARIFYING!

“Men are qualified for civil liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains on their own appetites—in proportion as their love to justice is above their rapacity;—in proportion as their soundness and sobriety of understanding is above their vanity and presumption;—in proportion as they are more disposed to listen to the counsels of the wise and good, in preference to the flattery of knaves. Society cannot exist unless a controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere, and the less of it there is within, the more there is without. It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters.”

(Edmund Burke, A Letter From Mr. Burke To A Member Of The National Assembly, 1791.)