Category Archives: Pastor

DALLAS SEMINARY GRADUATES DON’T PREACH THE BIBLE

First, let me say that I know a number of Dallas Theological Seminary (DTS) graduates who are careful students of the Bible.  Among the faithful, I have recently been blessed to know Jon Davies, the teaching pastor at Brenham Bible Church.  Jon handles the Word with reverence and diligently applies himself in the study.  Last, and certainly least, is the fact that I myself am a graduate of DTS.  Though I am “agnostic” on certain, secondary doctrines other DTS graduates hold, I remain grateful to God for the indelible impact of both professors and students.

Back to the subject line of this post…That is what I overheard from a theologian who some would say holds to a less than “conservative” position of the Bible.

I was in the bookstore of the seminary where this particular theologian teaches and could not help but eavesdrop on the conversation.  The theologian said to her friend, “I was just on vacation and so we went to the church my in-laws attend.  A Dallas Seminary guy was preaching.  It is amazing how poorly he handled the Scriptures even though he believes in the inerrancy of the Bible.  I don’t believe in inerrancy, but I treat the text of the Bible much more carefully than him.”

Holding to inerrancy is no safeguard against handling the Word of God in a sloppy manner.  Holding to inerrancy also won’t keep you out of bed with another man’s wife as the evangelical landscape makes painfully clear.

Do you hold to inerrancy?  For a few brave souls out there, you may want to declare that you don’t even know what it is, but you have heard it is important!

Repost

NONE AND DONE…WITH CHURCH

Nones and now Dones are newer categories which describe people who either have no affiliation and/or are finished with attending church.  I’ve met many and felt the impulse at times myself.  In a discussion at Jesus Creed yesterday, I posted this:

Here in Texas we enjoy great barbecue. Among the many options, Rudy’s bills itself as the “worst barbecue in Texas.” It actually is very good.

Perhaps local churches could take a cue. When the leadership of the church gives the impression that they are really doing the deed, and yet the reality falls far short, it sets people up for disillusionment. Perhaps more people would be at peace with their local church if the cheer leading and triumphalism were replaced by more humility and true, servant-leaders.

PASTOR’S KID

Barnabas Piper, son of famed preacher, John Piper, shares honest insights about his upbringing in a new book.

Barnabas Piper (on the left) is one of John Piper’s sons.  Barnabas has recently written a candid account of being a pastor’s kid (PK), especially the PK of a famous pastor.

Here is a revealing answer to a question (rest of interview below):

Religion News Service: What is one thing people would be shocked to learn about the Piper household?

Barnabas Piper: Depends on who you ask. Those who are huge fans might be surprised to know that our family has a lot of tensions and quirks. We have dysfunction and conflict. We don’t always get along very well. It’s not the idyllic repository of peace and knowledge they might have painted a picture of in their heads.

Those who see him as a heavy-handed fire breather would be surprised to know that he loves movies like “What About Bob” and is fiercely competitive. He even got a yellow card for berating a referee at one of my brothers’ soccer games one time.

http://jonathanmerritt.religionnews.com/2014/07/01/john-pipers-son-discusses-dysfunction-conflict-upbringing/

 

 

PASTOR TURNED SKEPTIC

A short time ago I read an article about a former pastor who became a skeptic.  The post 9/11 world did not make sense to him.  He figured there could be no God in such a world.  This kind of struggle of course is nothing new.

Andrew Delbanco has famously said Americans went from believing in the providence of God prior to the Civil War to believing in luck after it.  Too much carnage took place for one to keep believing in a God who is both good and in control of all things.

I also struggle to make sense of these realities, yet I am perplexed by those who choose to bail on the Christian faith.

The Bible makes it clear that we are living in a broken world where the most hideous things imaginable will take place.  Make sure to digest that important truth.  If “delicate women” will boil their own children for food (see Deut. 28:53-57), we know there is the capacity for all kinds of evil.

Further, if God had not made it clear that I will not understand many things this side of heaven, I also would consider bailing on the Christian faith.  However, God has made it clear we will only know in very small part.  There is quite a bit in Scripture on this truth (for example Deut. 29:29; Job 38-42; Isa. 55:8,9; I Cor. 13:12)

Luther, like the Psalmists (note plural) struggled with the silence of God, even the God who seems to hide Himself at times.  We should be glad for the candor of Scripture, but also chastened to remember we only now see in a “mirror dimly.”

So I wonder what Bible the pastor who bailed was reading.